Happy 70th Birthday Roger Steffens Ras Rojah

Roger Steffens “Reggae Obsession”

Happy 70th Birthday Ras Rojah

Many know Roger Steffens from his video lectures/tours about Bob Marley and Peter Tosh, or from his “Reggae Beat” radio show and magazine. Steffens co-hosted Reggae Beat on KCRW from 1979 until 1987, and Reggae Beat International from 1983 until 1987, which was syndicated internationally to 130 stations.  He has toured to many parts of the globe to give his lectures and multi-media presentation on the Life of Bob Marley and Peter Tosh. He has also contributed to countless music anthologies as a writer and photographer.  But to many of us, Roger is know for his generosity, kindness, and willingness to share with reggae fans his rare audio and video gems that fill his massive reggae archives. If fate or luck or whatever works your way, it’s a beautiful day if you get to visit his archives. (Big thanks to his wife Mary for putting up with all us fanatic fans)

Please read wikipedia for more information on Roger and visit his site Roger Steffens Reggae Archives, because roger’s life is so  full of interesting achievements and people he has met I can’t write about it all here. Two interesting things many reggae fans don’t know about Roger is how he saved George Segals ass at the climax of movie Rollercoaster (he was the radio technician that jammed the bombers signal) or that he was close friends with fellow veteran and one of my favorite comedians/actors John Ritter.  His mind seems like a steel trap, ready to open and share his memories.  I remember a comment my brother made after I took him to meet Roger at his house. He said “Roger is like a encyclopedia. He knows everything”.


The list of visitors to his house and archives is testament to the importance of his knowledge and massive rare collection. I love that all the members of Bob Marley’s band the Wailers have visited, plus a countless list of other artists and reggae fans. The real topper and probably Roger’s most important visitor to him was Rolling Stone guitarist and reggae lover Kieth Richards. A Rolling Stone in your house….Wazzza!!!

I have not been to Roger’s archive since he moved from his old house by Echo Park.  Back in college, I  would visit him with my arms full of double tape decks.  I am happy to have donated some material to his archive knowing that he will share it with folks around the globe.   I treasure the time I got to spend chillin’ and learning about Jamaican music history, and hearing his stories about interviewing people like Peter Tosh, Bob Marley, Bunny Wailer, and Lee Perry.  Give thanks to Roger for all he has done to promote Jamaican Music all these years.

Happy EarthStrong to ya Rojah!!

Here is a special Tribute Video I made.

With Carlos Santana

With Lee Perry

With The Meditations

With Cedella Booker

Rog & CC Smith

With Familyman Barrett

With Joseph Hill and Sangie Davis

With Judy Mowatt and Marcia Griffiths of the I-Three

Advertisements

Peter Tosh – Reggae Sunsplash, July 1980 Ranny Williams Entertainment Center, Kingston, Jamaica Full Concert

Peter Tosh – Reggae Sunsplash, July 1980 Ranny Williams Entertainment Center, Kingston, Jamaica Full Concert

A wicked set from Peter Tosh.  He does some great songs like Hammer and Recruiting Soldiers.  A fairly good audience recording.  Many thanks as always to the tapers who help document these precious moments in music history.  And thanks to Johnny and Claude for help finally getting the venue and correct city.

1-Intro-Announce-400 Years
2-400 years
3-stteping razor
4-African
5-I, m the Toughest
6-Bush Doctor
7-Speech
8-Dont look back

CD2

1-Get up Stand up
2-Recruiting Soldiers
3-Hammer
4-Babylon Queendom – Talking for more –
5-Buck-in-Ham Palace

Peter Tosh – Glenn Miller Ballroom, Boulder, CO 2/13/79 Complete Soundboard Recording

Peter Tosh – Glenn Miller Ballroom, Boulder, CO 2/13/79 Complete Soundboard Recording

Some say blogs are for writing, I blog Music. Here is a pristine quality recording and performance from the Bush Doctor.
01 – Intro -400 Years
02 – Stepping Razor
03 – Pick Myself Up
04 – African
05 – Burial
06 – Soon Come
07 – I’m The Toughest
08 – Bush Doctor
09 – Don’t Look Back
10 – Get Up Stand Up
11 – Legalize It

 

Another Classic from the Dubwise Garage Collection

 

 

Who Killed Peter Tosh – Plus Bonus Island Zorro Boot Live at Roxy 1978

 

Below are 2 great pieces from my website Peter Tosh Tribute.  First is a great recording from the Roxy Th. in Los Angeles in July 1978.  2nd is an article from High Times Mag. called “Who Killed Peter Tosh”.
Pick myself up                                                    
African
I’m the Toughest
Bush Doctor
(You gotta walk) Don’t look back
Get up stand up
Legalize it
(Dangerous) Stepping Razor

 

 

Who Killed Peter Tosh by Eric Williams from High Times Jan. 1994

Peter Tosh – Live Acoustic and Interview Session KZEL Radio Studio, Eugene, OR

Peter Tosh – Unplugged

For those that have visited my blog.  I am not a big writer.  I have a very busy life and focus my posts on sharing rare music. Today is a special musical treat from the Bush Doctor Peter Tosh.  Live and chilling in the studio this gives a great glimpse into the intimate kind person Peter was, very warm, funny, and friendly.

Back in 1977 Peter Tosh did a tour of the USA.  Along the tour, Peter stopped a various radio stations to help promote his music and tour. One such occasion was at KZEL radio station in Eugene, OR. A few tracks from this session were released on the official Talking Revolution CD.  I try not to share official material, Peter Tosh fans should buy all official releases and support his estate. Many thanks to Roger Steffens for this gem. 

 

Talks About Herb

Pick Myself Up/ > on Talking Revolution

Talks about music

instrumental/

Talks about Oregon Legalization

Jah Guide (instrumental)/

Can’t You See/

Talks about musical inspiration

Fire Fire/ > on Talking Revolution

Livicates Tune to all intellectual Herb Smokers

I Am That I Am (benediction only)/

Don’t Want To Get Busted Into

Don’t Want To Get Busted/ > on Talking Revolution

Don’t Want To Get Busted Outro

Legalize It > on Talking Revolution

Peter does KZEL Radio Promo

 

Peter Tosh – Bethesda, MD 3/14/79 in the WHFS studio

Peter Tosh

Bethesda, MD  3/14/79 in the WHFS studio that afternoon, (7″ reel@ 3.75 ips)  Peter hangs out in the studio, gives interviews between songs, & plays a little acoustic guitar.  A great piece of Peter Tosh musical history. Thanks to the original taper.

Pick Myself Up (song is missing)
I am That  I am
Stand Firm
interview
Jah Is My King {Creation} (acoustic)
interview
Commercials
Ketchy Shubby
Stepping Razor
interview
Don”T Look Back (with Mick Jagger)
interview
Jah God
Get A Beaten
Get UP Stand Up
Interview
Commercials
interview
?
400 Years

All one track. this what it includes in order. Almost best to download and listen to instead of playing in your browser.

peter tosh1979-03-14.d2t.mp3 peter tosh1979-03-14.d2t.mp3
Size : 91898.733 Kb
Type : mp3

Peter and Donald Kindsey

 

 

The Life of Peter Tosh – Roger Steffen’s look at the life of Peter Tosh thru music and interviews.

If you have never heard this tribute to Peter Tosh by Roger Steffens, then your in for a real treat.  This page is taken from my Peter Tosh Tribute site. HERE > Peter Tosh Tribute

Peter Tosh – The Life of Peter Tosh KCRW broadcast unknown date.

Roger Steffen’s look at the life of Peter Tosh thru music and interviews.

****************************************************************

Recording source: FM  Dubwise Transfer

Click each track to play, left click and save as to download
Part 1.

 

Interview – coming in hot
Interview – Vienna 1980

Roger Intro for show

Interview 1983 with Mel Cheplowitz.

Simmer Down

rasta shock them – treat me good

Interview 1983 cont.

walk and don’t look back early version
Acoustic What Your Doing To Me

Interview about being on Jamaica Music Business

steppin razor early version
simple tom
the letter
rightful ruler
Arise blackman

Talks about Here comes the Judge

here comes the judge

Part 2,

Selassie Seranade
Sun Valley
We can make it uptight

Interview about education

downpressor man early slow version
no sympathy
get up, stand up

Talks about his songs >stop that train

Chris Blackwell talks about telling Bob to go Solo >Once Bitten
lion

Talks about Mark of The Beast

Mark of The Beast



Part 3.

Talks about His Work to Do

Igizabier Y masgwan ( let jah be praised)
dont want to get busted live in studio

Talks about Laws
Speech One Love Peace Concert as Peter says “An Integration Concert
Equal Rights  One Love Peace Concert

Speech at One Love Peace Concert talks about the Shitsytem

Bush Doctor   One Love Peace Concert
Interview talks about his speech at One Love Peace Concert

Part 4.

bob and peter in LA – get up, stand up
guide me from my friends
dont call it no rat race
explains bumba klot meaning
bumba klot live
Speech when power went out at Jamaica World Music Fest. 1982.

you can’t blame the youth  live

them a fi get a beaten  live
pick myself up  live in studio

Speaks about worries of Assassination Possibilities  > mama africa live

Peter talks about Future with Roger
Interview > jam inna jamdown 

Closing Remarks by Roger > Fire Fire live Studio

Bob Marley and the Wailers – One Love Peace Concert Rehearsal – Strawberry Hill, Jamaica April 1978 2012 Birthday Countdown #6

Bob Marley and the Wailers – One Love Peace Concert Rehearsal –  Strawberry Hill Rehearsal, Jamaica April 1978

01 Exodus 
02 Horn Jam 
03 Natty Dread 
04 Natty Dread 
05 Natty Dread 
06 Natural Mystic 
07 Natural Mystic 
08 War 
09 War 
10 War
11 War
12 War
13 War 
14 Exodus 
15  Punky Reggae Party
16 Punky Reggae Party 
17 Punky Reggae Party 
18 Punky Reggae Party

click each track to listen, or left click and save as to download

 

 

Having just returned from exile in England after being shot before the Smile Jamaica Concert in 1976, this is probably the first music bob played after returning to Jamaica.  The audio is very rare, and I have never seen photographs or video of this rehearsal.  I have included pictures when Bob meet with Claudie and Bucky before the concert.   There is also the complete known audio recordings from all the artists that performed except Bob’s performance as it is officially released and I try to focus on unofficial documents. Also to clear up the confusion about the lightning that strikes during Bob’s performance, that didn’t actually happen, it was a special effect added by the production people at Island Records.  Very dramatic but not real.

Below is a brief history of the One Love Peace Concert from wiki. If you were there, you are more than blessed, super blessed.

The idea for the One Love Peace Concert came from two gangsters from rival political factions, who happened to be locked up in the same jail cell together and who both wanted to alleviate the violence. Claudius ‘Claudie’ Massop (JLP) and Aston ‘Bucky’ Marshall (PNP) decided that the best means to bring the country together was to use music as a uniting factor and organize a major concert. Quickly realizing that Bob Marley was a critical element upon which their success depended, Massop flew to London after being released from jail to convince Marley to perform at the event. Marley accepted the invitation, and the concert was Marley’s first performance in Jamaica since he was almost assassinated there in 1976.

The concert

The One Love Peace Concert brought together 16 of Reggae’s biggest acts, and was dubbed by the media as the “Third World Woodstock”, “Bob Marley plays for Peace” and simply, “Bob Marley Is Back.” The concert attracted more than 32,000 spectators with the proceeds of the show going towards “much needed sanitary facilities and housing for the sufferahs in West Kinston.” The concert was kicked off at exactly 5:00 PM with a message from Asfa Wossen, the crown prince of Ethiopia, praising the concert organizers’ efforts to restore peace in Jamaica. The concert was divided into two halves, with the first half devoted to showcasing some of Reggae’s newer talent, and the second half devoted to the more established artists.

Jacob Miller energetically launched the second half of the concert, during which time Edward Seaga and Michael Manley got to their seats. The highlight of Miller’s performance came when he “leaped onto the field with lighted spliff herb and offered it to a police man, donned the lawman’s helmet, jumped back onto the stage and continued the number as he paraded the herb.”

Alternatively, Peter Tosh took the opportunity during his performance to berate the two political leaders sitting directly in front of him for their positions against legalizing marijuana. His set lasted 66 minutes, and Tosh spent almost half of that time denouncing the problems prevalent in society. At around 12:30 AM, Bob Marley took the stage to perform some of his biggest hits. The climax came during his performance of Jammin’ when he called both Manley and Seaga to the stage, and in a symbolic gesture, the three held up their hands together to signify their unity.

Bob Marley said the following as he called the two politicians onstage, and while he held their hands above his head and said while improvising on “Jammin'”:

Just let me tell you something (yeah), to make everything come true, we gotta be together. (Yeah, yeah, yeah) and through the spirit of the Most High, His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie I, we’re inviting a few leading people of the slaves to shake hands. . . To show the people that you love them right, to show the people that you gonna unite, show the people that you’re over bright, show the people that everything is all right. Watch, watch, watch, what you’re doing, because I wanna send a message right out there. I mean, I’m not so good at talking but I hope you understand what I’m trying to say. Well, I’m trying to say, could we have, could we have, up here onstage here the presence of Mr. Michael Manley and Mr. Edward Seaga. I just want to shake hands and show the people that we’re gonna make it right, we’re gonna unite, we’re gonna make it right, we’ve got to unite . The moon is right over my head, and I give my love instead. The moon was right above my head, and I give my love instead.

The impact of the concert

Unfortunately, the event did little to quell the political violence. The event’s two organizers, Massop and Marshall were both killed within two years after the concert. Manley’s critics argue that the he used his appearance at the concert to demonstrate the bond he shared with the Jamaican sufferahs and Rastafarians. Within a few weeks of his appearance, he called for an election and won with a significant margin, only further escalating the violence between the two major parties. It was not until Bob Marley’s funeral in 1981 that the two political figures met each other in person and once again shook hands.

Performances

The Meditations

“Life Is Not Easy”

“Woman Is Like A Shadow”                                          

Althea and Donna

“Uptown Top Ranking”

Dillinger

“Teeth And Tongue”

“The War Is Over”

“Eastman Skank”

The Mighty Diamonds

“Keep On Moving”

“There’s No Me Without You”

“I Need A Roof”

“Happy”

“Mrs Melody”

Culture

“Natty Never Get Weary”

“Natty Dread Taking Over”

“Stop This Fussing & Fighting”

Dennis Brown

“Children of Israel”

“Love Me Always”

“Milk & Honey”

“Whip Them Jah”

“How Could I Leave”

Trinity

“Who Say They A Gone”

“Already”

“Yabby You Sound”

Leroy Smart

“Ballistic Affair”

Jacob Miller and Inner Circle

“Forward Jah Jah Children”

“I’m A Natty”

“Discipline Child”

“Shakey Girl”

“Top Ranking Special”

“Tired Fe Lick Weed”

“Peace Treaty Special”

Big Youth

“I Pray Thee”

“Every Nigger Is A Star”

“In This Ya Time”

“House of Dreadlocks”

“Isiah The First Prophet Of Old”

“Peace At Last”

“Old Man River”

“Hit The Road Jack”

Beres Hammond

“Smile”

“I Miss You”

“One Step Ahead”

Peter Tosh

“Igziabeher”

“400 Years”

“Stepping Razor”

“Burial”

“Equal Rights”

“Legalize It”

“Get Up, Stand Up”

Ras Michael and The Sons of Negus

“Ethiopian National Anthem”

“None A Jah Jah Children No Cry”

“Come Down”

“In A Amagideon”

“A New Name”

Bob Marley & The Wailers

“Lion of Judah”

“Natural Mystic”

“Trenchtown Rock”

“Natty Dread”

“Positive Vibration”

“War”

“Jammin'”

“One Love / People Get Ready”

“Jah Live”

Visit my site here for an exclusive playlist of the entire artists above audio.  ONE LOVE PEACE CONCERT AUDIO

Peter Tosh – Rebel with a Cause, Reggae’s unsung Revolutionary.

Peter Tosh  – Rebel with a Cause, Reggae’s unsung Revolutionary.

 

To mention Peter Tosh in the same circle as Malcolm X, Che Guevara, or Nelson Mandela is not uncommon. Peter was a true revolutionary, activist, and a rebel witha cause.  To wake up peoples slumbering mentality as he would put it, toshake up the system with Truths and Rights, Peter Tosh was like no other rebel.  He used the power of reggae music to spread his messages.  Never underestimate the power of music.  His stance on the Legalization of Marijuana lead to him being beaten numerous times, but he  was not afraid to speak his mind and Get Up Stand Up for his and our rights.

In recent years many have wondered why someone who gave so much seem almost forgotten. As an original member of the Wailing Wailers (The Wailers & Bob Marley and the Wailers) Peter was an original driving force in Jamaican Music in the late 60’s, and onward tell his tragic death in 1987.  He, Bob Marley, and Bunny Wailer helpedbring reggae music to the world and influencing many worldwide to learn more about Rastafari and their African Heritage. Peter was the only Wailer who could play an instrument and is know to have taught Bob how to play.  He wrote and arranged manyof The Wailers early songs. In 1973, he left the group for a solo career and went onto create historic LP’s like Legalize It and Equal Rights.

 

Though perennially overshadowed by Marley, Peter’s militant style and views on life often appealed to many more than Marley’s more loveable friendly personality.  “In places like Africa, Peter is an even more respected star than Bob because of his militancy,” says reggae archivist Roger Steffens. “He was almost beaten to death on several occasions by Jamaican police because of his anti-establishment views. He didn’t just talk the talk, he walked the walk — and people respect that all over the word.”

 

Peter was a amazing person who not only influenced Jamaican musical history but through his music, words, and philosophy have impacted millions worldwide. I love Peters out-spoken militant personality that refused to be scared to speak his mind especially when it involved Truths and Rights and the Legalization of Herb.  Legalize It is more than an anthem, it is a whole Movement world-wide.  If still alive today, I know he would be at the forefront of the battle to Legalize It!  Peter’s music and messages have been a inspiration to myself and others and will continue to be for many generations.  People will always need to Get Up, Stand Up for their rights and Peter should be recognized for his contributions to the world just as  much as Bob Marley or any other freedom fighter that has received large media attention.  A true Rebel speaking for Equal Rights and Justice.

Visit the Peter Tosh Tribute Site for rare pictures, video, and music. HERE

By John DuBois (Dubwise Garage) Jan. 14th 2012

 

Joe Higgs, The Father of Reggae

 From my Joe Higgs Tribute Page . Below is a piece by Marcia Higgs and also info. from Wiki.

Who is JOE HIGGS and why was he dubbed

“FATHER OF REGGAE?” 
– Marcia Higgs

According to reggae music history, in the early 1950s through 1960s, when it was virtually impossible for the residents of TRENCH TOWN and other neighboring communities to even be considered for “menial” jobs in Jamaica’s main-stream work force, it was JOE HIGGS that these “other” underprivileged ghetto outcasts would ultimately turn to for musical guidance. Though a youth himself at the time, this self-taught musical prodigy was said to have converted his 19 THIRD STREET, TRENCH TOWN, tenement backyard into a sort of musical training camp, where he would teach his peers some of the lessons
he had learned. These music lessons, or “jam-sessions” as they were commonly called, were often rigorous in voice technique, breath control, harmony structuring, effective song-writing, and of course, learning to play the “box” guitar.


 Joe Higgs (born Joseph Benjamin Higgs, 3 June 1940 – 18 December 1999) was a reggae musician from Jamaica. In the late 1950s and 1960s he was part of the duo Higgs and Wilson together with Roy Wilson. He was a popular artist in Jamaica for four decades and is also known for his work tutoring younger musicians including The Wailers and Jimmy Cliff.

Higgs was instrumental in the foundation of modern Jamaican music, first recording in 1958 for producer and businessman (and later Jamaican Prime Minister) Edward Seaga, both as a solo artist and with Roy Wilson. He is often called the “Godfather of Reggae”. His first release (with Wilson) was “Oh Manny Oh” in 1958, which was one of the first records to be pressed in Jamaica and went on to sell 50,000 copies. Higgs and Wilson also recorded for Clement “Coxsone” Dodd in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The partnership with Wilson dissolved in 1964 when Wilson emigrated to the United States. Higgs then concentrated on a solo career and also worked with Carlos Malcolm and the Afro-Jamaican Rhythms, before joining Lynn Taitt’s The Soul Brothers as lead vocalist.

Higgs mentored young singers in his yard and began working with Bob Marley in 1959. In fact, it was at one of the informal music lessons Joe Higgs held in Trench Town, that Bob and Bunny Livingston met Peter Tosh.[3][4] Marley acknowledged later on that Higgs had been an influential figure for him, while Higgs described their time together: “I am the one who taught the Wailers the craft, who taught them certain voice technique”. It was Higgs who introduced the Wailers to Dodd in 1963 Higgs has also been described as the “Father of Reggae” by Jimmy Cliff. For a while Higgs toured with Cliff, acting as his bandleader as well as writing songs for Cliff including “Dear Mother”, and also performed with The Wailers on their US tour when Bunny Wailer refused to go on the tour in 1973. Higgs wrote “Steppin’ Razor” in 1967 as his entry in the Festival Song Contest, later recorded by Tosh without crediting Higgs. Higgs later won a court case to establish his rights as composer but never received any profits from the song’s success.

Higgs won the Jamaican Tourist Board Song Competition in 1972 with “Invitation to Jamaica”, released as a single on his own Elevation label, and much of his best-known solo work was issued in the 1970s. Singles included “More Slavery” (released on Micron), “Creation” (Ethnic Fight), “Let Us Do Something” (Elevation), and “World Is Upside Down” (Island). His debut album, Life of Contradiction, had been recorded in 1972 for Island Records, but as Island boss Chris Blackwell felt that it would be difficult to market it remained unreleased until 1975, when it was issued by Micron Music and has been described as “a seminally sophisticated work combining reggae, jazz, and rhythm and blues influences to create a new texture that would have a profound effect on the best Jamaican music to follow”.  As well as The Wailers, Higgs also helped several other singers and groups including The Wailing Souls. His second album, Unity Is Power, was released in 1979 and further singles followed on Cliff’s Sunpower label and Bunny Wailer’s Solominic imprint.His 1983 single “So It Go”, with a lyric critical of the Jamaican government of the day was banned from airplay and led to harassment which would eventually lead to Higgs relocating to Los Angeles, where he lived for the rest of his life. Two further albums were released in the 1980s, Triumph (1985) and Family (1988), and in 1990 he recorded Blackman Know Yourself on which he was backed by the Wailers Band, and includes covers of the Marley/Lee Perry songs “Small Axe” and “Sun Is Shining”. In 1995, his final album was issued, Joe and Marcia Together, a collaboration with his daughter.

A majority of Higgs’ songs were connected to his impoverished life in Trenchtown where he grew up. Higgs considered that it was out of the poverty and violence of Kingston’s shantytowns such as Trenchtown and Johnstown that the reggae music had grown. Before reggae hit big on the western music scene with Bob Marley, it was understood as a “ghetto music”. Higgs was the very first artist out the ghetto music scene to have lyrics which primarily dealt with every day troubles. In his own words:

“Music is a matter of struggle. It’s not good that it’s known you’re from Trenchtown. Reggae is a confrontation of sound. Reggae has to have that basic vibrant sound that is to be heard in the ghetto. It’s like playing the drum and bass very loud. Those are the basic sounds. A classical reggae should be accepted in any part of the world. Freedom, that’s what it’s asking for; acceptance, that’s what it needs, and understanding, that’s what reggae’s saying. You have a certain love come from hard struggle, long suffering. Through pain you guard yourself with that hope of freedom, not to give up…””

Higgs died of cancer on 18 December 1999 at Kaiser Hospital in Los Angeles.[2] At the time of his death he was working with Roger Steffens on an official biography, and had been working on a collaboration with Irish artists for the Green on Black album.He was survived by twelve children, including his daughter Marcia, who is a rapper, and son Peter, a studio guitarist.

In 2007, the Joe Higgs Music Awards were established in his honour.

Tons more pictures and live music on my website tribute to Joe Higgs  HERE

 

 

 Here is a  great interview from the Reggae Beat Radio show from KCRW in Santa Monica, CA

01 Joe Higgs - Interview Reggae Beat Radio.mp3 01 Joe Higgs – Interview Reggae Beat Radio.mp3
Size : 1640.719 Kb
Type : mp3
02 Joe Higgs - Interview Reggae Beat Radio.mp3 02 Joe Higgs – Interview Reggae Beat Radio.mp3
Size : 16614.188 Kb
Type : mp3