Bob Marley and the Wailers – One Love Peace Concert Rehearsal – Strawberry Hill, Jamaica April 1978 2012 Birthday Countdown #6

Bob Marley and the Wailers – One Love Peace Concert Rehearsal –  Strawberry Hill Rehearsal, Jamaica April 1978

01 Exodus 
02 Horn Jam 
03 Natty Dread 
04 Natty Dread 
05 Natty Dread 
06 Natural Mystic 
07 Natural Mystic 
08 War 
09 War 
10 War
11 War
12 War
13 War 
14 Exodus 
15  Punky Reggae Party
16 Punky Reggae Party 
17 Punky Reggae Party 
18 Punky Reggae Party

click each track to listen, or left click and save as to download

 

 

Having just returned from exile in England after being shot before the Smile Jamaica Concert in 1976, this is probably the first music bob played after returning to Jamaica.  The audio is very rare, and I have never seen photographs or video of this rehearsal.  I have included pictures when Bob meet with Claudie and Bucky before the concert.   There is also the complete known audio recordings from all the artists that performed except Bob’s performance as it is officially released and I try to focus on unofficial documents. Also to clear up the confusion about the lightning that strikes during Bob’s performance, that didn’t actually happen, it was a special effect added by the production people at Island Records.  Very dramatic but not real.

Below is a brief history of the One Love Peace Concert from wiki. If you were there, you are more than blessed, super blessed.

The idea for the One Love Peace Concert came from two gangsters from rival political factions, who happened to be locked up in the same jail cell together and who both wanted to alleviate the violence. Claudius ‘Claudie’ Massop (JLP) and Aston ‘Bucky’ Marshall (PNP) decided that the best means to bring the country together was to use music as a uniting factor and organize a major concert. Quickly realizing that Bob Marley was a critical element upon which their success depended, Massop flew to London after being released from jail to convince Marley to perform at the event. Marley accepted the invitation, and the concert was Marley’s first performance in Jamaica since he was almost assassinated there in 1976.

The concert

The One Love Peace Concert brought together 16 of Reggae’s biggest acts, and was dubbed by the media as the “Third World Woodstock”, “Bob Marley plays for Peace” and simply, “Bob Marley Is Back.” The concert attracted more than 32,000 spectators with the proceeds of the show going towards “much needed sanitary facilities and housing for the sufferahs in West Kinston.” The concert was kicked off at exactly 5:00 PM with a message from Asfa Wossen, the crown prince of Ethiopia, praising the concert organizers’ efforts to restore peace in Jamaica. The concert was divided into two halves, with the first half devoted to showcasing some of Reggae’s newer talent, and the second half devoted to the more established artists.

Jacob Miller energetically launched the second half of the concert, during which time Edward Seaga and Michael Manley got to their seats. The highlight of Miller’s performance came when he “leaped onto the field with lighted spliff herb and offered it to a police man, donned the lawman’s helmet, jumped back onto the stage and continued the number as he paraded the herb.”

Alternatively, Peter Tosh took the opportunity during his performance to berate the two political leaders sitting directly in front of him for their positions against legalizing marijuana. His set lasted 66 minutes, and Tosh spent almost half of that time denouncing the problems prevalent in society. At around 12:30 AM, Bob Marley took the stage to perform some of his biggest hits. The climax came during his performance of Jammin’ when he called both Manley and Seaga to the stage, and in a symbolic gesture, the three held up their hands together to signify their unity.

Bob Marley said the following as he called the two politicians onstage, and while he held their hands above his head and said while improvising on “Jammin'”:

Just let me tell you something (yeah), to make everything come true, we gotta be together. (Yeah, yeah, yeah) and through the spirit of the Most High, His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie I, we’re inviting a few leading people of the slaves to shake hands. . . To show the people that you love them right, to show the people that you gonna unite, show the people that you’re over bright, show the people that everything is all right. Watch, watch, watch, what you’re doing, because I wanna send a message right out there. I mean, I’m not so good at talking but I hope you understand what I’m trying to say. Well, I’m trying to say, could we have, could we have, up here onstage here the presence of Mr. Michael Manley and Mr. Edward Seaga. I just want to shake hands and show the people that we’re gonna make it right, we’re gonna unite, we’re gonna make it right, we’ve got to unite . The moon is right over my head, and I give my love instead. The moon was right above my head, and I give my love instead.

The impact of the concert

Unfortunately, the event did little to quell the political violence. The event’s two organizers, Massop and Marshall were both killed within two years after the concert. Manley’s critics argue that the he used his appearance at the concert to demonstrate the bond he shared with the Jamaican sufferahs and Rastafarians. Within a few weeks of his appearance, he called for an election and won with a significant margin, only further escalating the violence between the two major parties. It was not until Bob Marley’s funeral in 1981 that the two political figures met each other in person and once again shook hands.

Performances

The Meditations

“Life Is Not Easy”

“Woman Is Like A Shadow”                                          

Althea and Donna

“Uptown Top Ranking”

Dillinger

“Teeth And Tongue”

“The War Is Over”

“Eastman Skank”

The Mighty Diamonds

“Keep On Moving”

“There’s No Me Without You”

“I Need A Roof”

“Happy”

“Mrs Melody”

Culture

“Natty Never Get Weary”

“Natty Dread Taking Over”

“Stop This Fussing & Fighting”

Dennis Brown

“Children of Israel”

“Love Me Always”

“Milk & Honey”

“Whip Them Jah”

“How Could I Leave”

Trinity

“Who Say They A Gone”

“Already”

“Yabby You Sound”

Leroy Smart

“Ballistic Affair”

Jacob Miller and Inner Circle

“Forward Jah Jah Children”

“I’m A Natty”

“Discipline Child”

“Shakey Girl”

“Top Ranking Special”

“Tired Fe Lick Weed”

“Peace Treaty Special”

Big Youth

“I Pray Thee”

“Every Nigger Is A Star”

“In This Ya Time”

“House of Dreadlocks”

“Isiah The First Prophet Of Old”

“Peace At Last”

“Old Man River”

“Hit The Road Jack”

Beres Hammond

“Smile”

“I Miss You”

“One Step Ahead”

Peter Tosh

“Igziabeher”

“400 Years”

“Stepping Razor”

“Burial”

“Equal Rights”

“Legalize It”

“Get Up, Stand Up”

Ras Michael and The Sons of Negus

“Ethiopian National Anthem”

“None A Jah Jah Children No Cry”

“Come Down”

“In A Amagideon”

“A New Name”

Bob Marley & The Wailers

“Lion of Judah”

“Natural Mystic”

“Trenchtown Rock”

“Natty Dread”

“Positive Vibration”

“War”

“Jammin'”

“One Love / People Get Ready”

“Jah Live”

Visit my site here for an exclusive playlist of the entire artists above audio.  ONE LOVE PEACE CONCERT AUDIO

Bob Marley & and The Wailers – Babylon By Bus Stops at the Paris Pavilion, Paris, France June 26, 1978


Bob Marley & The Wailers


A great show, not very common to collectors.  Some great intros to some of the songs like War. Bob is in a great mood, don’t miss this show.  Babylon By Bus is  a live album released by Bob Marley & The Wailers in 1978.  Most of the  tracks on that album are from  the 3 nights at the Pavillon de Paris from the  25-27th June 1978, during the Kaya Tour.   Bob did a great interview with Rock and Folk Magazine which is included here and also translated to English.
Paris Pavilion
Paris, France
June 26, 1978

aud > gen(x) > cdr(x) > eac (secure) > flacl (level 8)

01.Positive Vibration
02.Burnin and Lootin
03.Them Belly Full
04.Rebel Music
05.War > No More Trouble
06.Running Away > Crazy Baldheads
07.I Shot The Sheriff
08.No Woman No Cry
09.Is This Love?
10.Jammin’
11.Punky Reggae Party
12.Get Up Stand Up
13.Exodus (diagnose, gaps, abrupt end)

Thanks to Niteshift for this great show.


The tracks seem out of order. Burnin’ and Lootin’ sounds like the start of the show, with the crowd chanting for Marley. With the exception of some problems with Exodus, a fine show.


The pic directly above is not from Paris.

Rock & Folk’s Hervé Muller: Don’t you think the fact that you have spent a lot of time
away from Jamaica has changed your music?
Bob Marley: We are the ones who play it. It’s not Jamaica that plays
music for us (he bursts out laughing)
Hervé Muller: But you play for very different audiences, like the Paris one.
Bob: Yes but all these people want the music from Jamaica. Even in Paris
we can’t change the music we play. Do you see what I mean?

Hervé Muller: What about the presence of Junior (Marvin, the Wailers’ guitar
player)? Didn’t it stengthen the group?
Bob: Yes, Junior strengthened the group, Junior is easy

Hervé Muller: Do you mean as a man or as a musician?
Bob: Both. He is cool. We understand each other.

Hervé Muller: Do you think the Wailers line-up won’t change anymore?
Bob: Maybe that it will stay the same, maybe that it will change… I
think any change will be additional.

Hervé Muller: Horns?
Bob: (He suddenly laughs and gets excited) yeah mon! that’s it!

Hervé Muller: Would you like to have a horns rhythm section again, like in the
days of ska?
Bob: Yeah! Yeah mon! That would be great. Like in the days of ska. At
the time being, and since quite a long time, we have concentrated on the
rhythm. But now that everyone feels they are at the place in the rhythm,
we could use horns again… yeah.

Hervé Muller: The way your records are produced is rather different from most of
the Jamaican production. You have never really been into dub in particular.
Bob: Me? No, I have never really liked this dub stuff you know. Dub is
something else. We couldn’t follow the dub way because we prefer a music
that is like a message, you know. But dub is nice. I only start enjoying
it now.
Hervé Muller: Why are you recording again old songs like Kaya?
Bob: Mhh, Kaya, that’s a nice tune… the night we wrote it, Kaya, we were
in a remote part of the countryside. It was raining during the night and
we were in a very small house and… we didn’t have herb. That’s why we
sang : “gotta have kaya now for the rain is falling…”.
(“kaya” is one of the many names jamaicans use for marijuana).

Hervé Muller: When was it?
Bob: Around … 1970. Yes, 1970.

Hervé Muller: You have also recut much older songs, that date way back from the
ska days such as One Love. How does it feel to do a rendition of a tune
you wrote 10 or 15 years ago?
Bob: Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. it’s a matter
of vibrations. I couldn’t even know for One Love. Musically, I had never
felt it as good.
Hervé Muller: What about the lyrics?
Bob: It’s as if I understood them better now than the first time. The
first time is raw inspiration. The second time is comprehension… songs
evolve. I don’t know how or why. There are songs I don’t really
understand until I see the reactions they lead to in the street. Someone
else finds out their meaning, and I understand it in turn.
Hervé Muller: Do you consider the Wailers as now being Bob Marley’s band, or will
the other members contribute in a more active way?
Bob: Everybody is writing songs. Junior is writing an album. Tyrone
(Downie, the organ player) too…

Hervé Muller: Yes, but would they compose for the Wailers?*
Bob: Yes, if they want to. Everyone has to be free.

Hervé Muller: But the band’s line-up is different from the time when Bunny and
Peter were part of the Wailers, isn’t it?
Bob: Yeah mon, you can stay all your life in the same place you know.
Even trees grow (laughter)

Hervé Muller: Do you think you could work with them again one day?
Bob: Sure man, at any time…
Hervé Muller: Have you seen Peter (Tosh) since the problems he has experienced in
Jamaica (he was arrested and beaten by the police)?
Bob: Yes, it’s allright, cool.

*RF: What do you think when things like that happen?*
Bob: What happened to Peter? I think it’s nothing but ignorance…
ignorance on the police side.

Hervé Muller: You live again in Jamaica now, but you have been away for a long
time (after the shooting by the end of 1976)…*
Bob: Yes…

Hervé Muller: For too long?
Bob: No, just the right time.

Hervé Muller: The last time we met, you were about to go to Africa for the first
time. Did you finally go there?
Bob: No, not yet. But this time I will go (laughter)! No, this time it’s
true… I want to go to Nigeria, to Ghana, and one or two other places.
Hervé Muller: Here is again an old question: do you really think european
audiences understand all the rasta stuff?
Bob: I don’t know if they understand, but they have pretty good
reactions you know (he is laughing like a kid). That’s a reality, not a
joke or a dream. It may seem strange, but it’s not as strange as a
religion because rasta is a reality. It’s difficult for people who have
undergone and accepted brainwashing to understand what I and I, the
rastas, say. We are going beyond what we have taught you (…) To be rasta
is to live a life in which you are always happy. But rasta know
the whole world will fight them…

*RF: The last time we met, you told me that if reggae singers now sing
rasta songs, that’s because everybody loves rastas.*
Bob: Yes, but not EVERYbody. As far as I am concerned, the more people
talk about it, the better it is… people know there is a lot of fights in
the world, but they can’t explain why. Everybody fights, but at the same
time nobody wants to ackowledge any explanation. There is something bad
in it, psychologically. If we fight, we should be able to explain why.
Otherwise… (he has a little smile that concludes his speech)
Hervé Muller: Do you think people who like your songs understand all of this in
them?
Bob: Many people can appreciate what we are trying to say. I never give
up believing in the people, because that’s all we have you know… when I
was born, I have been taught the same thing that everybody, until I
found by myself that there was something else. It happens at a different
time for each one of us.

Hervé Muller: Do you think jamaican musicians who have been raised in London,
like Steel Pulse, have a different approach of reggae?
Bob: They try… because reggae, out of any analysis or interview, is a
feeling. And anybody has that feeling you know, that timing… that’s
reggae: a very special feeling and timing. All reggae musicians have it.
It’s something very deep. When we (the Wailers) started to record songs
like Duppy Conqueror, we did it in a clean and professional way. The
feeling is there, but is professional. It couldn’t be accepted on the
worldwide record market without becoming professional. One or two of us
had to do it so that the world could appreciate it, do you see what I mean?

Hervé Muller: Do you mean reggae musicians have become more professional?
Bob: Yes, they didn’t have the choice.

Hervé Muller: But didn’t they lose something in that process?
Bob: I don’t see what they have lost in it (laughter). But I can see
what they have won!

Thank s to Bob Marley Magazine and my wife for translation help.